Sunday, 8 November 2015

Olek's yorkshire puddings

Olek's lovely mum, Marta, posted a photo of his yorkshire puddings - these are proper home made ones, not out of a box from the supermarket. Aren't they magnificent?

I hereby delegate all cooking of yorkshire puddings and toad in the hole to Olek when he is on the boat with us. AND I have requested toad in the hole for dinner when he comes to stay at New Year here in Waikanae - who cares if it's not summer food!? I'll make the brown onion gravy and the mashed potatoes ... Yumble tumble.

7 comments:

Eileen Turnbull said...
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Eileen Turnbull said...

They look wonderful, would Olek share his recipe ? Mine have never ever looked like those.




Marilyn McDonald said...

Hi Eileen, My hunch is that it's the recipe in the Edmonds Cookbook. 1 cup flour, 1/2 tsp salt, sifted, add 2 eggs plus 1 cup milk and 2 tbsp cold water. Beat to within an inch of its life. Heat oven to at least 200 deg C (I usually do it at 210), put a little oil in each hole of the muffin tin, and put into the oven till extremely hot. Get it out, close the oven door to keep the heat in, and pour in the batter as fast as possible (it should bubble a bit in the oil when poured in), then shove it back into the oven for 25-30 minutes. It will rise dramatically as long as the oil is hot enough. Cheers, Marilyn PS That's the mix we also use for toad in the hole - my favourite winter dinner with mash, peas and carrots smothered in onion gravy ...

Eileen Turnbull said...

Thanks Maralyn , I will give that a go. Maybe my downfall was guess work and not measuring the ingredients! ,,,,,,,,,,

Marilyn McDonald said...

Eileen, my mum always said that the mixture needed to be the consistency of runny cream, if that helps. Keep me posted for next time! Cheers, M

Graham said...

The really traditional way to cook Yorkshire Pudding is as one single large pudding cooked in a tray placed underneath the oven rack on which the Sunday joint is roasting. The idea was that all the juices and fat from the meat went into the pudding. It meant less waste, less washing up and more nutrition for the same expenditure when times were hard. Yorkshire puddings were originally famine food meant to fill you up when there wasn't enough meat for a decent portion to go round. Today I think most people would think them too fatty.

The correct recipe and the correct way to cook them was a constant source of conflict in many marriages, as each partner claimed that their mother's way was the best and only way.

The only absolutely correct way to cook them is, of course, the way you like ‘em.

Marilyn McDonald said...

Hi Graham, When I was a kid Mum always made yorkshire pudding in one dish using fat she had scooped out of the roasting dish. She didn't use milk, just egg and water. I use the muffin tins as it creates a fairer share of yorkshires among the diners - they are always so popular that we now have them with any roast and indeed with some casseroles. And I use oil because I don't cook with lard anymore ...
Cheers, Marilyn